Approximate Conference Schedule

NOTE: click on the gray boxes below to expand/contract more information on the presenation.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

Noon - 5:00PM Exhibits Setup
Pre-Conference Workshop
9AM - 5:15PM
Integrating Focusing into Your Clinical Practice
John Amodeo, Ph.D., MFT
Laury Rappaport, Ph.D., MFT
Focusing, developed by renowned psychologist Eugene Gendlin, is based on extensive research that he conducted with Carl Rogers on what led clients to be successful in therapy. They found that those clients who were able to slow down and engage with their authentic feelings and inwardly “felt sense” and “felt meanings” were the clients who improved the most. In this Focusing training, you will learn the basic Focusing processes including:

  • How to access and engage with a felt sense
  • How to bring an accepting, gentle presence toward our inner experience
  • Brief interventions to integrate Focusing within the moment-to-moment unfolding of a psychotherapy session (applied to any theoretical orientation)
  • “Clearing a Space” for stress reduction
  • Advanced listening skills
  • Applications to individuals, couples, and groups

Workshop Objectives

  1. Help participants gain a basic knowledge of Focusing and its therapeutic applications.
  2. Help participants discern when a Focusing intervention may be appropriate.
  3. Learn Focusing-specific questions and inquiries to help clients connect more with their bodily felt sense of issues and concerns.

7 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

Pre-Conference Workshop
9AM - 5:15PM
Points of Intervention:
Discovering & Developing Your Natural Skills with Clients II
Allen Berger, Ph.D.
Thom Rutledge, LCSW

Allen and Thom delineate basic tenets of effective therapy by way of a humorous look at what ineffective therapy looks like. Some didactic presentation, much interaction between the presenters, open discussion with participants and experiential demonstrations.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to list 5 tenets of effective therapy.
  2. Participants will have an expanded definition of experiential therapy.
  3. Participants will be able to demonstrate specific techniques for addressing client ambivalence and/or resistance.

7 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 

Friday, February 6, 2015

8:00AM - 8:30AM Exhibits
 

8:30AM - 10:30AM
Keynote

An Overview of the Past 20 Years of Addiction Treatment
Harry Haroutunian, M.D.
Historical Review of Substance Abuse over the past 20 years reviews “The Changing Face of Addiction”

This presentation will discuss the severe stigma of addiction that started years ago and continues today.

Addicts are scorned by communities and celebrities are hounded by paparazzi. Government agencies purport to view addiction as a disease but they often work in opposition to that position.

Treatment communities still employ stigmatizing programming and use language, such as “dirty” urine, “crack head” and garden variety “drunks”. The system of stigmatization, blaming, punishing and making moral judgments instead we need to provide treatment and help that would change behavior.

Treatment has evolved and today with new research we know that addiction deals with the midbrain. Is it possible to separate the disease of addiction from the stigma? Addiction and mental health problems are still spoken of in hushed tones, and patients and their families are still blamed.

Funding for addiction treatment is discriminatory, despite passage of the Federal Mental Health Parity legislation, mental health and substance use disorders continue to be treated differently and often poorly.

Removing the stigma, guilt and shame from the equation, people would find it easier to discuss openly with a healthcare provider.

Doctors were slow to recognize addiction as treatable and so patients were encouraged to find help outside the medical community.

What can we expect in the future?

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will understand the changes that have occurred throughout the history of substance abuse.
  2. Participants will comprehend how many things have not changed in our society regarding addiction.
  3. Participants will recognize issues that need to be changed, for the future of substance abuse evaluation, treatment and aftercare.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

10:30AM - 11:00AM Exhibits
 
11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshops

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

The Insidious Addiction: Screening, Assessment, and Treatment for Problem Gambling
Timothy Fong, M.D.
Margarit Davtin

The presentation is about the causes, consequences, signs/symptoms, and treatment of problem gambling, a disorder that affects 2.3% of North Americans. Data are drawn from treatment seeking problem gamblers enrolled in the state-funded California Gambling Treatment and Education (CalGETS) Program (N= 2,000). The presentation will highlight the sociodemographic characteristics of this sub-population, as well as gambling patterns, personality characteristics,  and co-morbid mental health disorders in order to illustrate at-risk patterns or behaviors. Secondly, the presenters will discuss diagnostic criteria and how clinicians can identify problematic gambling patterns. Lastly, various treatment options will be outlined.

Workshop Objectives

  1. To raise awareness within mental health professionals about the prevalence and patterns of problem gambling.
  2. To offer treatment recommendations to mental health professionals and quick screening/assessment tools for problem gambling.
  3. To discuss new and interesting research findings in the literature that offer insight into the comorbidity of problem gambling with several other mental health and addictive disorders.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Part A:
Positive Psychology and the 12 Steps
Maria Gray, M.A., M.Ed., MFT Registered Intern

Part B:
The Conspiracy Against Authenticity - the Setup in Our Culture That Leads Us toward Addiction
Chris Stretch, ACSW, CADC

Part A:
Bill Wilson, the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous stated that sober alcoholics “Absolutely insist on enjoying life.” There is a synergy between the concepts of Positive Psychology and the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. The presentation explores the similarities between Positive Psychology and the 12 Steps and offers evidence based interventions that therapists (and other professionals) can use with clients to increase their level of satisfaction with life and recovery.

The interventions are based on Martin Seligman’s (the founder of Positive Psychology) work and Sonja Lyubomirsky’s Happiness research. These interventions can be used with clients who are in any 12 Step program as well as clients who are not in a 12 Step program.

The presentation also explores the relationship between mindfulness/meditation and happiness; offering practical mindfulness suggestions and helpful hints for those interested in beginning a meditation practice.

Part B:
First coined by Dr. Allen Berger, The Conspiracy Against Authenticity refers to the setup in western culture that leads many toward inauthenticity and subsequent neurosis and addiction. The premise of the presentation stems from the early work of Gestalt Therapy Founder, Fritz Perls, who observed that people often set out to actualize a mental concept, or an idealized version of who they “should” be rather than actualizing who they actually are… and when this occurs, pathology ensues. This presentation sheds a very specific and distinct light on the idealized concepts, or inauthentic ideas that proliferate in our culture aiding and abetting the “should” process Fritz Perls alluded to that drives many on a clear path towards neurosis and addiction.

The Paradoxical Theory of Change will be utilized to illustrate how healing can come from acceptance and ownership of the concepts discussed. The steps of recovery will be the paradoxical spiritual tools to show specifically how each inauthentic concept can be unpacked and replaced by a recovery concept.

Addiction stems from isolation and separation, while recovery is all about connection and unity. As stated in the Paradoxical Theory of Change it is essential that one fully invest in a maladaptive way of functioning in order to create new, more functional possibilities. In other words, I must fully own how I separate and isolate myself from my authentic self and from others so that I may have the possibility of moving toward the connecting and uniting principles of recovery.

Workshop Objectives

    Part A:
  1. Become familiar with evidence based Positive Psychology Interventions.
  2. Learn about the evolution and theory of Positive Psychology and the field of happiness research.
  3. Understand the synergy between 12 Step programs and Positive Psychology and how that can be used with clients in recovery.

  4. Part B:
  5. As stated by Fritz Perls, “awareness, is in fact curable”. The first and foremost objective of the presentation is to promote awareness rooted in rigorous honestly and ownership of functioning which is the guiding force of the Paradoxical Theory of Change.
  6. Such awareness is of great benefit to clinicians in the field of substance abuse treatment, as it will engender understanding and compassion for the client and also give clinicians areas of focus with clients. This awareness and understanding can then lead to better choices and options for both clinicians and clients alike.
  7. The principles of recovery are extraordinarily powerful in not just helping individuals abstain from drinking alcohol or using drugs, they are also wonderful tools to debunk inauthentic concepts that proliferate in our culture and separate us from our own authenticity and from one another. As is stated in the recovery literature as well as in most spiritual traditions, the real truth or Reality is deep down within each and every one of us. By shedding a clear and distinct light on the concepts that separate us, the hope of this presenter is that authentic, recovery based concepts will not only be understood intellectually, but will emerge from within the listener striking a chord that will help that person connect with the deeper, more spiritual element of his or her self and inspire that individual to carry that message to those he or she treats.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Pharmageddon
Sturary Finkelstein, M.D.
Stephen Schur, B.A.

Currently the United States is experiencing its worst unintentional drug overdose death rate primarily from prescription drugs, the CDC has declared prescription drug abuse a public health crisis. Orange County has a person die every two days from prescription drugs. The majority of physicians do not recognize this as public health crisis as indicated by the CDC’s grand rounds lecture Feb 2011. Part 1 of this lecture will identify that Rx drugs, specifically opioids, are a public health crisis due to abuse and unintentional overdose death; identify the street values of the drugs, identify the recent political responses in CA (From Nov 2012 - March 2013), the legislation that is being proposed within CA and how it will effect physicians. Physicians will be educated on opioid tolerance and opioid induced hyperalgesia as well. The majority of physicians are not aware of all of the above topics and should be informed.

The majority of physicians do not use all or any of the tools that are validated and available to document that they are doing everything within the clinical setting to prevent abuse, misuse, diversion and death from prescription drugs. These tools will be presented, discussed and shown how they may be used within a risk mitigation algorithm.

The majority of physicians do not know how to talk with patients when aberrant behaviors are discovered concerning their narcotic use, how to speak with patients concerning aberrant behaviors will be discussed as well as documenting the aberrant behavior and how the patient will need to reconcile it. The majority of physicians do not have an exit strategy for the patients they are prescribing narcotics to other then eventually dismissing them from the practice or they die form an overdoes; exit strategies (generally intervention and referral) that keep the patient under medical care while mitigating the physician’s risk will be presented. Physicians are great at prescribing medications that patients may become addicted to; they have very little understanding how to get them off. Solutions to getting patients off will be offered.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Grasp the scope of Rx drug abuse nationally and regionally, understand Rx drugs and the Street.
  2. Grasp the concept of opioid tolerance and opioid induced hyperalgesia.
  3. Recognize appropriate intervention & referral to treatment when aberrant behaviors are recognized and when narcotics are not working.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Treatment with Military, Veterans, & their Families
Mark Mitchell, MFT

This workshop cover the following: working with military culture, veterans, & family members.

It will cover the common struggles these families endure and what works. Particular attention to the counselors role & addiction, suicide, PTSD, moral injury, & lifestyle issues.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Counselors will learn what the values differences are between military & civilian culture & how to work with the veteran & their family.
  2. Counselors will how interview a veterans from a strength based approach & manage their own stress.
  3. Counselors will learn best practices regarding veterans, addiction, ptsd , moral injury, & lifestyle issues.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Motivational Interviewing: A Practical Application for Special Populations
Katheryn Whitaker, LMFT
Toby Spiegel, Ph.D.
Robert Weathers, Ph.D.

This interactive presentation offers an overview of how to use Motivational Interviewing when addressing specific addiction populations in treatment. Participants will gain an overview of basic concepts of Motivational Interviewing. A brief review of current research and program design will be presented in order to understand the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing. Specific steps on how to use this treatment approach with clients dealing with addiction including specific issues such as sexual addiction, eating disorders and working with couples will be offered. Participants will learn through interactive participation and role-play how to increase their therapeutic skills in treatment as well as learn how to utilize motivational interviewing with specific populations.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will learn the basic application of, and clinical rationale for, motivational interviewing. Participants will learn the effectiveness of this model in treating clients with addiction issues.
  2. Understand basic treatment techniques, including specific lines of questioning, use of affirmation, and reflective listening interventions for clients dealing with various addictions, including substance and sexual addictive behaviors. Participants will practice basic techniques of motivational interviewing to use with clients during the different phases of treatment including resistant clients.
  3. Understand how to use Motivational Interviewing when working with diverse client populations struggling with addictive behaviors. Issues in treatment working with diverse populations (e.g., early vs. later recovery) will be addressed during the presentation.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 
1:00PM - 2:00PM Exhibits
 

2:00PM - 3:30PM
Keynote

Unpacking the Therapeutic Value of the 12 Steps
Allen Berger, Ph.D.
Herbert Kaighan, B.A.
Ingrid Mathieu, Ph.D.
Thom Rutledge, LCSW

The Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous have been misunderstood and stereotyped as promoting religion. This couldn’t be farther from the truth. The Steps possess an incredible psychological methodology that when worked in sequence creates a profound psychological transformation. This distinguished panel will be moderated by Dr. Allen Berger and will discuss the therapeutic forces operating in the Twelve Steps and how you as a therapist can integrate these concepts into your work with those suffering from addiction including alcoholism.

Workshop Objectives

  1. To identify four of the therapeutic benefits of working the Twelve Steps.
  2. To list one intervention that will help a client work through their resistance to working a particular Step.
  3. To describe the overall therapeutic value of the Twelve Steps.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 
3:30PM - 4:00PM Exhibits
 

4:00PM - 5:30PM
Keynote

Embracing Hope: Using the Latest Treatment Breakthroughs to Improve Addiction Recovery Rates
Constance Scharff, Ph.D.

Although the scientific literature is filled with the latest findings in addiction recovery treatment and evidence-based therapies are proven effective, most treatment facilities continue to use a 12-step based treatment model. Further, those psychotherapists outside treatment facility settings don’t often know which resources are proven effective to use to supplement their activities. This keynote address will inspire practitioners to step out of their comfort zone and incorporate the latest evidence-based practices into their treatment programs and build relationships with professionals to provide services outside of treatment. We will also examine a series of the most clinically effective therapies and the latest in neuroscience  research, to understand how a changing understanding of addiction and the brain is improving the ways in which we intervene with addicts and improve treatment outcomes.

Workshop Objectives

  1. List at least three evidence-based therapies that can be used to reduce relapse rates among addicts in recovery.
  2. Define addiction as behavioral disorder and challenge current notions of addiction as a disease.
  3. Outline the neuroscientific research into addiction, explaining latest understandings of how addiction changes the structure and function of the brain.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 

 

Saturday, Feburary 7, 2015

7:30AM - 11:00AM Exhibits
 

7:45AM - 9:15AM
Keynote

Quieting the Hungry Ghost: Mindful and Compassionate Relapse Prevention
Richard Fields, Ph.D.

Although the scientific literature is filled with the latest findings in addiction recovery treatment and evidence-based therapies are proven effective, most treatment facilities continue to use a 12-step based treatment model. Further, those psychotherapists outside treatment facility settings don’t often know which resources are proven effective to use to supplement their activities. This keynote address will inspire practitioners to step out of their comfort zone and incorporate the latest evidence-based practices into their treatment programs and build relationships with professionals to provide services outside of treatment. We will also examine a series of the most clinically effective therapies and the latest in neuroscience  research, to understand how a changing understanding of addiction and the brain is improving the ways in which we intervene with addicts and improve treatment outcomes.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Identify the key elements of lapses and relapses.
  2. Identify the role of compassion and mindfulness in reducing reactivity, shame, and disconnection.
  3. Implement positive psychology and learned optimism to maintain motivation, and hope.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 

9:15AM - 10:45AM
Keynote

Lessons About Recovery from the Real Life Experiences of the Mooney Family
Robert Mooney, M.D.

The Mooney family has had a unique experience in the field of addiction recovery. This presentation will look at the over 50 years of continual involvement in working with addicts and their families. Dr. Robert Mooney is the 2nd physician of this family generation and will help review how the field of addiction medicine has evolved over the past century. The problems facing the field today look eerily similar to those experienced in the past. Therapists, counselors, social workers and other practitioners can benefit from the historical prospective as well as the cutting edge of a profession that seems to always offer promises which seem to be frustratingly slow in delivery.

Workshop Objectives

  1. State one of the early techniques used in early psychiatric interventions of the alcoholic.
  2. Identify the precipitating event which led to the modern era of alcoholism as an illness.
  3. Explain how medications can be counter productive in the treatment of addiction.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 
11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshops

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Demystifying Addiction: Understanding Addictions as an Attachment Disorder
Thomas Hedlund, LMFT

In this presentation Thomas Hedlund discusses addiction as a brain disease and an attachment disorder rooted in early emotional development. Recent breakthroughs in attachment and affective neuroscience help explain how early life survival and adaptive mechanisms become barriers to flexibility and change in adult life. Dramatic scientific images of the brain demonstrate the changes between addicted and normal brains. Using current neuroscience, stories, legend, case examples and personal stories Thomas weaves together a compelling argument for addiction as a destructive attempt to restore a person to emotional balance or equilibrium.

Workshop Objectives

  1. List five specific brain changes Participants will be able to identify at that occur from chemical dependency.
  2. Identify survival mechanisms and understand a process for assisting the client in creating a personal roadmap for repair and change.
  3. Recognize and teach the compulsive and addictive cycle that is created and maintained by toxic shame and how to interrupt it.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Plural Recovery: Evidence-Based Relapse Prevention for Couples
Robert Weathers, Ph.D.
Colleen Kelley, LMFT

Attachment injuries (relationship trauma) cannot typically be worked on effectively during active addiction or during the post-acute-withdrawal phase (often 6 months to 1 year after literal abstinence). Recent advances in neuroscience make this clear. Even after having establishing a solid foundation in recovery, one of the primary stressors leading to relapse in the recovering addict is relational conflict. Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) with couples provides an evidence-based treatment approach for healing relationship wounds. Applied here to longer-term addiction treatment and relapse prevention, EFT provides a roadmap to plural recovery by engaging both the recovering addict and his/her significant other. This presentation draws on active audience participation, and features a thorough grounding of clinical theory and research in practical role-plays of what needs to happen in effective addiction treatment interventions.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Understand why the addicted brain has limited ability to successfully navigate relationships. Address the inherent limitations in the mind’s capacity for self-reflection, empathic attunement, and self-awareness during addiction as well as the earliest, post-acute-withdrawal phase of recovery. Utilize basic neuroscience information to address and reduce inherent shame and stigma in addiction and the early recovery process. Understand how this shame prohibits healing within close relationships.
  2. Understand the process that the addicted individual’s significant other undergoes during the 1st year of recovery. After undergoing profound ruptures, disappointment, loss, betrayals of trust, and other traumas owing to the addiction, the significant other is often burnt-out and in need of supportive assistance. Addressing the significant other’s needs, while introducing psycho-education regarding the recovery process, helps to pace expectations and produce a more realistic view of the repair work necessary for rebuilding the relationship.
  3. Utilize attachment theory to understand the necessary building blocks of a secure and connected relationship. Provide a live role-play that shows how a therapist can sensitively address, and begin to repair, the attachment injuries that are intrinsic to the addictive process. Examine recovery in the context of a “we.” Address the pressing question for most couples in recovery: how do you build a foundation of consistent, mutual support, along with a map for repairing and moving through relational distress from the present into the future?

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Trauma and the 12 Steps: Clinical Keys for Enhancing Recovery Services
Jamie Marich, Ph.D., LPCC-S, LICDC-CS

Some of the toughest clients presenting for therapy are plagued by issues of co-occurring trauma and addiction. Although the popular 12-step approaches to addiction treatment are still appropriate for clients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma-related diagnoses, rigid application of the disease model and 12-step principles may prove more harmful than helpful for clients in need. In this workshop, participants will learn how to blend traditional knowledge about the disease of addiction and 12-step approaches to recovery with the latest research and practice knowledge on trauma. As a result, participants will find that they will be able to better connect with addicted clients who struggle with trauma, and deliver the help that they so desperately need in a way that honors their experience. In this workshop, participants will learn how to blend traditional knowledge about the disease of addiction and 12-step approaches to recovery with the latest research and practice knowledge on trauma. As a result, participants will find that they will be able to better connect with addicted clients who struggle with trauma, and deliver the help that they so desperately need in a way that honors their experience. Interaction, group participation, and experiential learning are all featured in this workshop.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Describe how certain 12-step approaches, slogans, and customs may be counterproductive when working with a traumatized client.
  2. Explain how certain features of 12-step recovery are productive for working with addicted survivors of trauma stress and identify how these features can be implemented into treatment.
  3. Develop a plan for working 12-step recovery strategies alongside appropriate treatment for the traumatic stress issue(s), applying at least three clinical techniques from various psychotherapeutic approaches to help clients attain addiction recovery in a trauma-sensitive fashion.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Part A:
The SMART Recovery Meeting Experience
Tom Horvath, Ph.D.

Part B:
12 Step Alternatives
Guy Lamunyon, MSN, RN, CAS

Part A:
This presentation will demonstrate an actual, basic SMART Recovery meeting, using workshop participants who volunteer to be in this meeting. These participants may role play someone or be themselves. Following the meeting the components of the meeting and the rationale for each component will be presented (and illustrated with additional brief role plays). Included in the presentation will be the primary elements of SMART Recovery, including meeting rules, meeting agenda, role of the facilitator, the 4-Point Program, the SMART Recovery Tools for Recovery, and SMART Recovery’s positions on various addiction issues. Participants will also learn about additional SMART Recovery resources and how to obtain training to become a facilitator.

Part B:
This presentation will describe alternatives to AA/12 Step Programs. Treatment professionals have an ethical responsibility to assist clients who resist 12 Step treatment to acceptable alternative programs.

The presentation will describe, discuss and explain alternatives to AA/12 Step program including SMART RECOVERY, SECULAR ORGANIZATION FOR SOBRIETY, LIFERING, CELEBRATE RECOVERY, HARM REDUCTION SELF HELP NETWORK, WOMEN FOR SOBRIETY and MEN FOR SOBRIETY.

Relevant care law on AA as a religion will be explained.

Workshop Objectives

    Part A:
  1. To experience the differences between a 12-step meeting and a SMART Recovery meeting.
  2. To identify the commonalities between a 12-step approach and the SMART Recovery approach.
  3. To recall the two primary SMART Recovery tools, the ABC and the CBA.

  4. Part B:
  5. Explain the problems of clients with 12 Step program resistance.
  6. List the 12 Step alternative groups, including SMART, SOS, LIFERING, SECULAR ORGANIZATION FOR SOBRIETY, LIFERING, CELEBRATE RECOVERY, HARM REDUCTION SELF HELP NETWORK, WOMEN FOR SOBRIETY and MEN FOR SOBRIETY.
  7. Describe how to make a referral to alternative groups, including SMART, SOS, LIFERING, SECULAR ORGANIZATION FOR SOBRIETY, LIFERING, CELEBRATE RECOVERY, HARM REDUCTION SELF HELP NETWORK, WOMEN FOR SOBRIETY and MEN FOR SOBRIETY.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Matrix Model Intensive Outpatient Treatment with Clients taking Addiction Medications
Michael McCann, M.A.
Jeremey Martinez, M.D.

Following the publication of the Matrix Model of Intensive Outpatient Treatment by Hazelden Publishing Company in 2005 and by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment in 2006, this treatment approach has been adopted by providers in all 50 states and in 20 countries. Over the years since these treatment manuals were published, there has been increased acceptance and use of addiction medications in conjunction with behavioral programs such as the Matrix Model. A revised version of the Matrix Model treatment manual is being published by Hazelden and includes a module on medication-assisted treatment which informs patients about the medication options which are available and addresses some of the common challenges associated with medication-assisted treatment.

This presentation will provide an overview of the Matrix Model treatment, a review of currently available medications for substance use disorders, and will discuss issues often encountered with the use of medication in the context of behavioral treatment including:

  1. Patients often have ambivalent feelings or are averse to being on medication. Too often in addiction treatment the attitude of both patients and treatment providers is that treatment is only successful if the patient is no longer taking medication. In fact, medication is acceptable, useful, and sometimes necessary in recovery.
  2. Patients taking medication sometimes encounter criticism or rejection from some in the 12-Step community. The position of the 12-Step program, however, is acceptance of medication.
  3. Some medication effects are immediate and impressive and there can be a tendency to narrowly focus on the medication and discount the need for more than medication-taking. If this occurs, the patient should be helped to expand his or her view of "recovery"; to include the behavioral/lifestyle changes that may not initially seem important for a successful treatment outcome.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will learn about the guiding principles and components of the Matrix Model Intensive Outpatient Treatment.
  2. Participants will learn about the medications currently available for substance use disorders.
  3. Participants will learn counseling approaches that address some common issues with patients taking addiction medications.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 
1:00PM - 2:00PM Exhibits
 

2:00PM - 3:30PM
Keynote

Shame and It’s Effect on the Therapeutic Relationship and Therapeutic Process
Gary Yontef, Ph.D.

Shame is a ubiquitous experience in counseling and psychotherapy. The feeling of shame by patient, counselor, or therapist is often unrecognized and not effectively worked with. When not recognized or not adequately responded to, it can interfere with treatment. When recognized it can be a powerful addition to the clinical work enhance the clinician’s self-support. We will discuss the process of shame, how it is created and triggered, how to recognize it in your patients and yourself, and how to work with it. We will talk about treatment from the perspective of relational gestalt therapy.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Recognize, distinguish, and understand the processes of shame and guilt.
  2. Able to discuss how shame is triggered and recognize when it is manifest in the therapeutic relationship.
  3. Able to reflect on how to work with shame in clinical practice.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 
3:30PM - 4:00PM Exhibits
 
4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshops

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

Multi-Family therapy at the Dinner Table
Matthew Healey, LMFT
Jennifer Musselman, MFT Intern

Research suggests genetic influence on the generational transmission of substance use disorders. This presentation will demonstrate how certain family rituals may also serve as a mechanism for the transmission of SUD’s from one generation to the next. Through this interactive session clinicians will learn techniques to identify specific family rituals that support substance abuse and connect them to patterns and behaviors developed over generations at the dinner table.

Whether lively and loud or seemingly quiet and uneventful, communication at the dinner table presents an opportunity to examine verbal and non-verbal communication in the family. In addition, this real-world shared experience can aid clients in developing insight into dynamics, roles, rules, patterns and styles of communication within the individual family.

Workshop Objectives

  1. The participant will learn to use the dinner table as a setting for multi-family therapy.
  2. The participant will be able to identify how family rituals influence the appearance of SUD’s in the following generation.
  3. The participant will learn techniques to help families utilize their own rituals in service of recovery.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

Recovering from Addictions and Making Amends: Myth, Mess or Mastery
Stuart Bassman, Ed.D.

The purpose of this workshop is to address the 12 Step concept of "Making Amends". An important component for the recovering addict is repairing the damage and hurt that has resulted from their addictive behavior. This is such a vital component of recovery that it has become the focus of preventing relapse and maintaining recovery. The concepts of compassion, forgiveness and reconciliation for oneself and others are viewed as antidotes to unresolved guilt, shame and resentments. In this workshop, the participant will have the opportunity to explore, practice and increase their repertoire of clinical skills relevant to "Making Amends" in a meaningful and profound manner as exemplified in the 12 steps.

Workshop Objectives

  1. The participant will understand and learn how to apply the concept of "making amends" in a clinically useful manner.
  2. The participant will be able to recognize, differentiate and implement the concepts of "forgiveness and reconciliation" in a clinical setting.
  3. The participant will learn about how compassion is an integral part of sustaining recovery and how to apply this within a therapeutic milieu.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

A New Era Ahead with Alcohol and Other Drugs: Reconsidering and Redefining Post DSM-5
Margaret Fetting, Ph.D., LCSW

Gone are the days of thinking you are either an alcoholic or you’re not-enter a future that asks the question, “Are you a healthy user of substances, or do you have a mild, moderate, or severe Substance Use Disorder (SUD)?”

The newest version of the diagnostic bible of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) was released in May 2013 and is now being actively studied for progressive implementation. It will be a time of confusion for clinicians, doctors, mental health facilities, patients, families, and insurance companies until these revisions are ready for everyday implementation. This workshop proposes an innovative clinical framework  to address these confusions.

DSM-5, replacing DSM-IV-R identifies significant revisions in the area of addiction diagnosis. It presents a spectrum of substance use disorders (SUDs), replacing the decades-old binary diagnostic choice between substance abuse and substance dependence. These new disorders range from mild, moderate, and severe.

This workshop provides a contemporary framework for exploring our relationship with alcohol and other drugs (AOD) that is simpatico with the DSM-5 spectrum approach to diagnosis. The new dimensional approach encourages the patient to explore who he is, not defend who he is not. The emphasis is likely to shift from “How can I justify my AOD (alcohol and other drugs) usage?” to “How can I explore my relationship with AOD?” A diagnostic reconsideration along a spectrum of behaviors breathes fresh air into a stifling binary paradigm.

Workshop Objectives

  1. To comprehend and become more facile in the application of the DSM-5 revisions in SUDs diagnosis.  To grasp its implications for in- and out-patient treatment, as well as insurance reimbursement.
  2. To develop a deeper appreciation and respect for our ancient desire to escape and expand consciousness through the use of AOD.  To recognize the distinction between non-pathological use or a mild, moderate, or severe substance use disorder.
  3. To explore implications in your own clinical practice and/or treatment settings and to create your own comfort zone with the adoption and clinical use of these profound diagnostic revisions.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

Taming the Perfectionist Within: Overcoming perfectionism and the insidious impact on substance abuse, eating disorders, and toxic relationships
Claudia Lineweaver, Ph.D., LPC
Stacie Cox, LCSW, CADC II, LADAC, CEC, CHt

In this workshop we will provide a working definition of perfectionism and how it fuels the abuse of drugs, alcohol, eating disorders, and problems in relationships.

We will discuss in small and large group format and through personal and clinical examples the origins, symptoms, and interplay of these intricacies.

We will ask audience members to share their own personal and professional experiences with the interplay of perfectionism in eating disorders, substance abuse, and impairments in relationships.

We will provide strategies for assessment and treatment that we will practice in small group format.

We also will provide recommended readings on the subject. 

Workshop Objectives

  1. The audience has a working definition of perfectionism, the associated symptoms, and the origins, and how it relates to and manifests in substance abuse, eating disorders, and relationship issues.
  2. The audience is able to assess and triage for perfectionism as it occurs with co-morbid disorders and dysfunctional relationships.
  3. The audience will gain an understanding of how to implement available treatment methods to empower themselves and clients to identify and reduce the negative impact of perfectionism on their recoveries and their abilities to maintain healthy, satisfying relationships.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

Learning How to Learn - Life skills are an evidence-based treatment approach. Can we improve how clients learn them?
Clark Carr, CAS
Marie Cecchini Sternquist, Ph.D
Richard Lennox, Ph.D

Achieving stable recovery usually involves learning new life skills; however, for many reasons addicts often have difficulty studying. This interactive session will look at innovative strategies that can help clients overcome learning difficulties and better apply the skills in your drug treatment program.

Scientific research since 1970 shows that effective treatment addresses the multiple needs of the patient rather than treats addiction alone. For most addicted persons, a lack of key life skills contributed to their drug or alcohol dependence. Yet most AOD program professionals are challenged to help recovering alcoholics and other drug addicts achieve life skills that translate post-program into longer term, successful recovery. This may even contribute to the ongoing debate concerning whether or not recovery can be achieved.

While we place tremendous attention on what recovering drug addicts should learn, even if this is not universally agreed upon, we have paid less attention to developing techniques that can help addicts study more effectively.

Clinical skills taught:

  1. Enabling program enrollees to "Learn How to Learn," no matter their earlier education or lack of it.
  2. Key factors that increase understanding of verbal and written information and how well clients actually use the skills taught during treatment after they've returned home to their families and communities.
  3. How omitting these factors can prevent clients from being able to apply what they have learned in your program to improve their lives.
  4. Results of application and examples from Narconon program graduates.
  5. Intriguing data from Routine Outcome Monitoring and a Longitudinal Study that reveal student attitudes regarding the value of studying "study" itself as an element of their rehabilitation.

Since inception in 1966, the Narconon program has approached drug rehabilitation as a matter of developing and increasing the life skills abilities of its program enrollees, even to the point of calling them "students" instead of patients, clients, or anything else.

Whether you are seeking to improve counseling skills or obtain new ideas for improved life skills training, effective study is a fundamental component of solving the problem of addiction.

Workshop Objectives

  1. To identify the purpose of addressing the ability to study as an key prerequisite to any other instruction or training a counselor would deliver in AOD rehabilitation or treatment.
  2. To identify three key barriers to study with practical examples of what are the unique negative results associated with encountering and being stopped by each of these study barriers.
  3. How to overcome each of the three barriers to study, with inter-active drilling.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 

 

Sunday, February 8, 2015

8:00AM - 9:00AM Exhibits
 

9:00AM - 10:30AM
Keynote

Handling Disruptions to the Therapeutic Alliance
Allen Berger, Ph.D.
Thom Rutledge, LCSW

Allen and Thom delineate basic tenets of effective therapy by way of a humorous look at what ineffective therapy looks like. Some didactic presentation, much interaction between the presenters, open discussion with participants and experiential demonstrations.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to list 5 tenets of effective therapy.
  2. Participants will have an expanded definition of experiential therapy.
  3. Participants will be able to demonstrate specific techniques for addressing client ambivalence and/or resistance.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 
10:30AM - 11:00AM Exhibits
 
11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshops

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

The Emotionally Indefensible Family Sculpture: Experiential Group Therapy
Oyen Hoffman, M.A., LAC, MFTc, NCAC II
Debby Zuinga, B.S., M.S., MFT, CAC III

We will briefly share personal experiences with experiential therapy including our own experiences receiving this form of therapy as well as discussing a few experiences applying the model ; while informing the audience of the immediate and long-term results. Pragmatically explain the nuances and orchestration regarding appropriate facilitation of experiential group therapies that combine family sculpture, psychodrama, and Gestalt therapies as applied concurrently.

With several volunteers we will facilitate a family sculpture utilizing ‘real-play’ to teach the practical application and proper administration of this all-important exercise.

We plan to close with a discussion on other experiential methods e.g. rock carrying, silent days, and hot-penning; followed by the reveal of current research underway at CeDAR that is supported by the world-class research department at the University of Colorado Hospital’s medical school. This would be a great time to offer other treatment facilities to participate in this research.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Introduce audience to tri-model experiential group therapy.
  2. Teach, experientially, the proper application and facilitation of family sculpture, psychodrama and Gestalt intervention concurrently.
  3. Leave the attendees with knowledge of how to use this intervention and the reasons why it is so affective and for whom it is most appropriate.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Pain Killers: The Latest Information, Insights and Treatment
Damon Raskin, M.D.

The abuse of prescription painkillers has been called a national health epidemic. Not only is it a public health crisis, but with individuals dying from accidental overdose every 19 minutes, it is a personal crisis for individuals and families. Every one of the more than ten thousand deaths a year from prescription drug overdoses is a father or son, wife or loved one of someone. In this session, I will discuss the current state of prescription drug abuse, focusing in particular on opioid abuse, the shift addicts often make from opioids to heroin, and current detox and treatment options. 

Workshop Objectives

  1. Provide a general understanding of the scope of prescription opioid and drug abuse in America.
  2. Describe three evidence-based detox tools for prescription painkiller or heroin treatment.
  3. Discuss the purpose of naloxone and provide an opinion as to whether or not it should be made widely available to both first responders and the family members of known opioid abusers.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

The Recovery Zone System
Al J. Mooney, M.D.

Getting sober and building a life in recovery can entail a complete overhaul of one’s life, including many things besides achieving sobriety: committing to recovery, treatment, relationships, family, friends, career, finances, recreation, health, and other elements. Trying to stay sober while dealing with all of these areas at once can be overwhelming.

The Recovery Zone System is an easy-to-follow, three-stage blueprint for getting into recovery, rebuilding a life, and staying sober for a lifetime. In this system, a life in recovery is divided into three chronological zones: the Red Zone: Stop. Activate Your Recovery; the Yellow Zone: Proceed with Caution. Build Your Life; and the Green Zone: Go. Celebrate Your Life. Within each zone, the person new to recovery finds clear guidance on what to focus on and when, in regard to treatment, fellowship work, spirituality, relapse prevention, relationship repair, recreation, sober socializing, education and career, finances, health, diet, and exercise. The System outlines clear objectives that should be achieved before moving on to the next Zone.

The Recovery Zone System also includes guidance on how clients can use their daily thoughts and actions to “remold” the brain around recovery (positive neuroplasticity). This is presented as the simple concept of TAMERS:

Think about recovery & Talk about recovery
Act on recovery, connect with others
Meditate & Minimize stress
Exercise & Eat well
Relax
Sleep

Finally, the Recovery Zone System also includes a new relapse prevention tool, the Recovery Zone ReCheck. With this tool, the client is encouraged to take stock of their life periodically (usually monthly), in order to anticipate upcoming events or situations that could lead to a relapse. When such events are noted, the client is encouraged to follow a clear prescription to avoid a relapse: 1) assess the potential effects of the upcoming situation, 2) determine which Recovery Zone he should move back to, in order to ramp up recovery activities, and 3) assess what other measures he can take to avoid a relapse.

Following the Recovery Zone System ensures that a person new to sobriety does not take on too much at once (a big risk for relapse), and takes the time to build a rock-solid foundation for a lifetime of recovery.

This workshop will explain all of these concepts to addiction professionals, and also engage them in practical exercises and discussions of how to use the Recovery Zone System with their own clients.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Understand that recovery is a lifelong developmental process requiring a focus on different issues at different times; be able to identify the three zones of this developmental process, and the recovery objectives that must be achieved in order to move one zone to another.
  2. Understand how a client can heal over time in these zones of recovery, from initial engagement in sobriety to living a full life in the culture of recovery and serving others, and understand how moving back a zone and changing actions during risky times serves as a relapse prevention tool.
  3. Learn how to use the Recovery Zone System with clients.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Relapse Prevention Counseling
Susan Musetti, MFT
David Lisonbee, B.S.

Relapse Prevention Counseling is based upon the concept that addictive behaviors are acquired, exercised habits with biological, psychological and social determinants and consequences. Engaging in an addictive behavior typically provides immediate rewards that increase pleasure and/or decrease pain.

Every client encounters a unique set of high-risk situations and possesses individual coping deficits and/or skills. Low motivation, low self-efficacy and anxiety are all barriers to patient coping. This presentation will also teach participants to initiate skills building and training directed toward replacing skills deficits with new, more effective tools.

Participants will learn that recovery from or change away from addictive behaviors includes disconnecting/ extinguishing pleasure seeking and/or pain reduction paired with alcohol or drug use, AND the development of effective and adaptive coping skills replacing addictive behaviors in achieving pleasure and/or pain relief.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Assess client’s potential interpersonal, intrapersonal, environmental and physiological risks for relapse and situations that may precipitate relapse; plan and implement cognitive and behavioral interventions to prevent or manage lapses, if they do occur (including denial and rationalization).

  2. Learn to teach broad strategies to develop lifestyle balance, respond to cravings, and counter cognitive distortions, and reduce stress that set up exposure to high risk situations where relapse is more likely (social support, exercise, meditation, diet, social relationships, spirituality, etc) and instruct to replace harmful indulgences (D&A) with adaptive “wants” that can provide pleasure and enjoyment or calming/stress reducing activities..
  3. Learn to collaborate with clients for higher rates of success and implement psychoeducational and cognitive restructuring to correct, challenge and replace misperceptions and maladaptive thoughts.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Panel: Critical Issues in Treatment and Recovery
Moe Gelbart, Ph.D.
Larry Smith, CAS III
Carol Teutelbaum, MFT
George DuWors, MSW, LCSW, BCD
Mark Baumgartner, LPC
Marcia Ullet, MA, LMFT, CPC
Mick Meagher, Esq

TBD

Workshop Objectives

  1. TBD.
  2. TBD.
  3. TBD.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 
1:00PM - 2:00PM Exhibits
 

2:00PM - 4:00PM
Keynote

The Past, Present and Future of Spirituality as a Modality of Addiction Treatment
Rabbi Shais Taub

More than 80 years since Carl Jung first suggested a spiritual solution for addiction, terms such as "Higher Power," "God of our understanding," and "spiritual awakening" have become so ubiquitous as to resemble platitudes.  This presentation will attempt to clarify the origins as well as the current state of spirituality in recovery and argue for a clear, but inclusive, understanding of the underlying spiritual axioms upon which the Twelve-Step model of recovery is predicated.  This presentation may be of particular interest to those seeking to reconcile the spiritual approach with other modalities of treatment as well as to those who wish to better articulate how spirituality works as a method of treatment. 

Workshop Objectives

  1. By tracing the historical origins of spirituality as a clinically advised modality of treatment, we will see how science and spirituality are not at odds with each other.
  2. By presenting a clear definition of the underlying spiritual axioms of the Twelve-Step model, we may dispel many of the misunderstandings that arise from loose definitions of spirituality.
  3. We will suggest a model for how spirituality can remain at the core of addiction recovery without creating conflict with either science or religion.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

2:00PM - 4:00PM Exhibits Load Out

 

Scheduling Information

Travel
The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel is close to Los Angeles Airport and runs a shuttle 24 hours per day. Registrants can arrive on the first day of the conference and depart on the last day of the conference.

Pre-Register
For those that pre-register, your name badge and registration package will be ready for you at the conference. Avoid the on-site registration lines and pre-register.

Planning
Plan to attend the entire conference. We have scheduled premiere Keynotes for the start and the end of the conference: they are not to be missed.

The Evolution of Addiction Treatment