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  • The Therapeutic Benefits of Group Therapy The Therapeutic Benefits of Group Therapy
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Approximate Conference Schedule

NOTE: click on the gray boxes below to expand/contract more information on the presenation.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Noon - 5:00PM Exhibits Setup
Pre-Conference Workshop
9AM - 5:15PM
The Point of Intervention: Learning How to Assess the Moment to Moment Unfolding of a Session and Generate Powerful Experiential Interventions


Allen Berger, Ph.D.
Thom Rutledge, LCSW

At the past three Evolution of Addiction Treatment Conferences Allen and Thom have created magic (In addition to being a great author Thom is also a very good amateur magician). They presented a series of workshops that received rave reviews from both seasoned professionals and trainees as well. What made these workshops so special was the practicality of what these two master therapists taught. Participants left with several new possibilities in terms of engaging and reaching their clients with powerful experiential interventions.

Simultaneously, these two are quite similar and quite specifically different. What they most definitely share is a passion for the work they do and a steadfast belief that if anyone tells you they have THE ONLY WAY to do therapy, you can be sure that they don't. An important part of what Allen and Thom teach together is that it is not only a therapist's right, but also a responsibility, to integrate his/her own person into their client work.

Allen and Thom believe that psychotherapy and psychotherapy training has been moving in the wrong direction. For the most part efforts have been focused on developing technical protocols to treat particular diagnoses rather than understanding how to reach, engage, and dialogue with people in a way that moves them towards change and problem resolution

This timely workshop will help you learn to treat people, not diagnoses. The training will focus on helping you learn how to use your natural skills in creating a therapeutic atmosphere and therapeutic alliance with your clients while at the same time helping a client discover new possibilities.

Allen and Thom will also help you learn how to identify opportunities for therapeutic interventions as they unfold during a session and how to create interventions that move clients towards the next step in their personal development.

A part of this pre-conference workshop is about freeing clinicians from training that might be stifling to their professional effectiveness and sharing ideas and experiences of creativity in a group setting.

Workshop Objectives

  1. List two ways to move from talking about a problem to enacting a therapeutic experiment.
  2. Describe two things that hold therapists back from being more authentic and spontaneous in their client work..
  3. List two interventions that help a client reorganize their personality and better coordinate all that they are.

7 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 

Friday, February 3, 2017

8:00AM - 8:30AM Exhibits
 

8:30AM - 10:30AM
Keynote

THE EARLY STORY: A History of Narcotics Anonymous
Boyd Pickard
Chris Budnick, MSW, LCSW, LCAS, CCS


Through the use of rare photographs, two very rare films clips, and hard to find audio recordings, The Early Story of Narcotics Anonymous traces: the rise of addiction, early attempts to cure addiction, stages in the criminalization of addiction, early adaptations of the AA program for addicts, the founding of NA, the near death of NA in the late 1950s, distinguishing features of NA, and the growth and dispersion of NA around the world.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Identify three factors that led to the rise of drug addiction in the United States.
  2. Discuss at that least three threats at NA experienced during its first decade of existence.
  3. Summarize the number of stages of growth of NA and its integration into addiction treatment in the United States.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

10:30AM - 11:00AM Exhibits
 
11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshops

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Revisioning the Alcoholic Marriage: Ending Discord with Mythology
Kerri Abernathy, LMFT
David Ripley, MA, CADAC

First presenter will give a brief introduction will be given into archetypal psychology as a possibly intervention to the alcoholic marriage. Presenter 2 will use a personal story as an example for attendees to identify with. Presenter 1 and 2 will follow with examples of revisioning through mythology, as well as other unconventional routes. This means letting go how we thought our marriages were supposed to look like, i.e., what we learned as children, and how substance abuse plays into this. Presenters will close with creative examples of what a marriage can look like and how it supports abstinence.

Workshop Objectives

  1. The restoration of polytheistic language for psyche.
  2. Retiring false or destructive mythologies.
  3. Improving communication.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Shifting the Paradigm: Adolescent Cannibis Abuse and the Need for Early Intervention
Jennifer Golick, LMFT

This presentation will address the increasing risks of use of marijuana and related products by adolescents. As THC content increases and methods such as "dabbing" increase frequency of use, risks of marijuana use as perceived by youth are decreasing. At a time when marijuana access is increasing nationally, a new marijuana landscape is forming in which both adolescents and treatment providers must adjust their perceptions of what was once thought of as a "harmless" drug. This presentation will discuss this new landscape, and what it means for adolescent drug treatment. Case material will be presented to highlight treatment challenges and recommendations.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Classify trends in adolescent cannabis use.
  2. Recognize the neurological impact of cannabis upon the developing brain.
  3. Outline the need for early intervention and a shift in the approach to the treatment of adolescent cannabis use.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Uncompromising Customer Service
Mike Schaub
Sara Kurtz, LMFT

Participants who complete this workshop will have engaged in an honest review of their perceived personal and professional customer service performance. As a group, we will break down the basic needs of our customers/clients and begin the process of incorporating a new culture of providing an exceptional customer experience.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Defining Customer Service and identifying the difference between internal and external customers. We will also share techniques for helping customers with complaints.
  2. Explore techniques for delivering Uncompromising Customer Service and examine the impact of unsatisfactory customer service.
  3. We will identify ways to communicate effectively and respectfully with customers and create strategies to change customer service culture.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Emotional Sobriety: The Missing Link in Recovery and Treatment
Allen Berger, Ph.D.
Herb Kaighan, BA
Bill Ryan, CLC, CIP, CATC

There is a growing interest in emotional sobriety and for good reasons. Some are calling it the missing link in recovery and treatment. Emotional sobriety can be defined as when the best of us does the thinking and talking. It is when our emotional well-being is determined by what we do or do not do rather than being knocked off balance by others or by what is going on around us. Dr. Berger and Mr. Kaighan will unpack the letter from Bill Wilson about emotional sobriety that was written to another AA member who was struggling with depression. Bill outlined what he learned about emotional sobriety while he was attempting to cope with his depression. Dr. Berger and Mr. Kaighan will relate the insights of Bill Wilson to the work of several master psychotherapists and spiritual teachers and then discuss how clinicians can help their client's develop emotional sobriety in their recovery.

Workshop Objectives

  1. List three characteristics of emotional sobriety.
  2. List three ways that emotional dependency interferes with emotional sobriety.
  3. Describe three interventions that will help a client maintain their emotional center of gravity or recover their emotional balance.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Leaking: Addressing Addiction Counselor Codependency
Mary Crocker Cook, D.Min., LMFT, LPCC, LAADC, CADCII

I have spent more than 25 years training chemical dependency counselors - they are my favorite people. For the most part they are either in personal addiction recovery or they are family members who have been touched by the chaos of addiction. The very passion that brings us to this work is the potential foundation for burnout and relapse if those issues are not identified and addressed throughout the career of a counselor.

I plan to address counselor codependency from early attachment disruption perspective, which results in anxious and avoidant relationship behaviors with our clients and co-workers as well as a dysregulated immune system. We will explore the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, the neurobiology of attachment, and positive strategies for increased emotional and physical resilience.

Our clients and co-workers are able to put their finger on our unhealed wounds on a regular basis due to our ability to identify with them. In fact, our identification is a mixed blessing. We can draw compassion from our ability to identify, and we can also step into our own blind spots and reactivity that may go unchecked without proper support and awareness.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will explore the developmental and neurobiological foundation of attachment-based codependency.
  2. Participants will identify the attachment-based codependent behaviors they may express in their working environment, and identify alternative more effective behaviors.
  3. Participants will deepen their appreciation and awareness of resilience and resilience strategies for counselor career longevity.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 
1:00PM - 2:00PM Exhibits
 

2:00PM - 4:00PM
Keynote

State of the Field Address: Where we are and Were We Need to Go
Harry Haroutunian, M.D.
Tom Horvath, Ph.D.
Tom McCall
Gary Fisher
Carol Tietelbaum, MFT
Allen Berger, Ph.D.


The addiction treatment field is in a state of flux. Different approaches to treatment are more prevalent and are more at odds than at any other point in the history of the treatment of addiction. This distinguished panel of experts in the field will address the current state of the art from each of their respective scopes of expertise which include addictionology, Twelve Step treatment alternatives, Narcotics Anonymous, trauma treatment, emotional sobriety and treatment program administration.

Workshop Objectives

  1. List three current trends in the treatment field.
  2. Describe the two challenges that Narcotics Anonymous faces in the next decade.
  3. Describe the conflict between medically assisted treatment and abstinence based treatment and how this conflict affects the field.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 
4:00PM - 4:30PM Exhibits
 

4:30PM - 6:00PM
Keynote

What You Need to Know --- Before an Insurance Investigation Begins
M. David "Mick" Meagher, J.D.

A discussion of the impact of the Health Net Insurance Investigations of Out-of-Network treatment centers. With a review and analysis of the overlapping California laws that are frequently misunderstood and often violated.

A review of:

California Business and Professions Code section 650, the law expressly prohibits any health care entity or provider from paying or receiving compensation (payment in any form) to induce referrals.

California Business & Professions Code, Section 2273(a) states: "Except as otherwise allowed by law, the employment of runners, cappers, steerers, or other persons to procure patients constitutes unprofessional conduct."

California Health & Safety Code ("H&S") Section 445 ("Medical Referral Services"), states: "No person, firm, partnership, association or corporation, or agent or employee thereof, shall for profit refer or recommend a person to a physician, hospital, health-related facility, or dispensary for any form of medical care or treatment of any ailment or physical condition."

California Insurance Code Section 1871.7(a) prohibits knowingly employing "runners, cappers, steerers, or other persons to procure clients or patients… that will be the basis for a claim against an insured individual or his or her insurer."

H&S Code 1250 - Drug Testing Kickbacks not allowed to addiction treatment centers. In any "health facility maintained, and operated for the diagnosis, care, prevention, and treatment of human illness, physical or mental, including ..... rehabilitation....., or for any one or more of these purposes, for one or more persons, to which the persons are admitted for a 24-hour stay or longer."

B&P Code 4999.30 which says in relevant part, "[a] person shall not practice or advertise the performance of professional clinical counseling services without a license..."

Workshop Objectives

  1. For the participant to understand the basic rules of law that apply to operating any health care facility or addiction treatment center, laws that are significantly different from other professions.
  2. For the participant to be able to develop a check list of billing and internal practices, so that a self-directed audit of business practices that may place the individual or center at risk.
  3. For the participant to understand the risks associated with regulatory or insurance company audits, and be prepared to successfully defend their business practices.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 

 

Saturday, Feburary 4, 2017

7:30AM - 11:00AM Exhibits
 

8:30AM - 10:30AM
Keynote

The Rules Have Changed: Why Gender Matters and What We Need to Do About It
Dan Griffin, MA

For years we have talked about the importance of gender in treating addictive disorders. However, the vast majority of that has been focused on the experience of girls and women. Finally, the conversation on gender and trauma has expanded to include the experiences of boys and men. This presentation explores the complexity of gender, gender relations, and addiction treatment through the primary constructs of the Man Rules and the Woman Rules. The presentation will also analyze how the gendered experience of trauma affects our lives individually, our relationships, and our experience of community. The Rules have changed and our evolving understanding of gender is transforming our experience of our humanity.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Understand and identify the emerging paradigms of fully integrated gender informed practices.
  2. Recognize the "Rules" that apply to being a man or a woman subscribed by our culture and by society.
  3. Determine how gender responsive and gender informed practices can enhance the effectiveness of addiction services.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 
11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshops

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Wise Caring: A Paradigm Shift in Family Treatment for Substance Abuse Disorders
Judy Voruz, MA, CADCII, MA

This experiential workshop offers a positive and proactive approach for families facing the challenges of a loved one who has a substance use disorder. Traditionally, a family member's caring has been pathologized and labeled as codependent. Recent research has found that labeling people not only impedes change but creates resistance to it. Most family members are desperate to help their loved one but also want to have a relationship with them that supports change. Participants in this workshop will engage with five elements that support and empower change: Inquiry, awareness of beliefs, assumptions, and expectations, an open and curious attitude, discovery and trust of your inner experience, mutuality as motivation. Participants will engage each element through the use of role playing, small group discussions, brainstorming and experiential exercises. The result will be a direct experience of how these methods impact and support change as well as alter one's perspective from a problem orientation to one of possibility.

Workshop Objectives

  1. To have a felt sense experience of the effectiveness of how the five elements create a different quality of relationship between a family member and their loved one.
  2. To understand how changing the quality of relationship between family members and the substance use disordered enhances change for both.
  3. To learn how to incorporate these methods into your work with families.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Differentiation and the Addict: Understanding the Concept of Differentiation as an Essential Component of Addiction Treatment
Chris Stretch, ACSW

The concept of "differentiation" comes directly from Dr. Murray Bowen as a result of his seminal work which brought to light a now well-utilized theoretical perspective of Family Systems Theory. Dr. Bowen likened the development of the self to that of cell biology where levels of differentiation directly affect the reactivity of one entity to another. Dr. Bowen further connects the level of differentiation of one's family as the pervading influence as to how emotionally reactive an individual will be in their life outside the family. Dr. Karen Horney expands on this concept by addressing the ways in which reactivity takes place. She postulates that individuals in what Bowen calls an "undifferentiated state" typically react in three ways. Against others (making others wrong), submitting to others (agreeing just to appease others) or by withdrawing from volatile situations. Dr. Horney further explains this continued reactiveness as a function of the "idealized" or "false self" which the presenter will argue is the "self " referred to in recovery literature ("the bondage of self"). Dr. Fritz Perls founder of Gestalt therapy defines emotional maturation as moving from "environmental support to self support", and Dr. Allen Berger refers to recovery as the process by which an individual recovers his or her "lost true self". The presenter will postulate in this presentation that essential to the emotional maturation referred to by Dr. Perls, as well as essential to recovering the "lost true self" Dr. Berger speaks of, is an addict's movement toward a differentiated, autonomous self.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Understanding differentiation. Dr. Murray Bowen's concept of differentiation will be fully explained using the work of Dr. Bowen, Dr. Karen Horney, Dr. Allen Berger and others. Essential to understanding differentiation is understanding that how the balance (or lack there of) of individuality and cooperation plays a significant role in differentiation.
  2. Connecting to differentiation of the self to the development of the "idealized" or "false self". Also discussed will be the forces in our families and culture that make differentiation difficult given both childhood introjections and introjections from our western culture. Many myths will be exposed.
  3. Using differentiation to guide interventions. Experiential interventions will be explained and discussed in-depth. The presenter will also engage the audience in experiential exercises that will further help guide interventions with clients. The interventions are geared toward helping an individual deepen their awareness and understanding of differentiation and how it is experienced in life.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Mental Health Law and the Addiction Counselor: Case Review, Ethical Dilemmas and Recommendations
Greg Bohall, PsyD, C.R.C., MAC, ICADC, CADC-II

There is a well-documented association between substance abuse and crime; approximately 80% of arrestees test positive for at least one illegal substance (Klag, O'Callaghan, & Creed, 2005). Approximately 40%-50% of referrals to community based treatment programs are from the criminal justice system (Klag, O'Callaghan, & Creed, 2005). There are typically two pathways of which an offender is referred: the offense was drug or alcohol related or the crime was induced by or involved drug- or alcohol-related behaviors. In 2014, the highest number of arrests were for drug abuse violations, larceny-theft, and driving under the influence (Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2015). This association between substance abuse and crime has made this a significant public health concern.

Criminal justice involvement can take on many forms that include community corrections (probation/parole), treatment courts (drug/mental health courts), pretrial diversion, and sentencing. This involvement not only requires the addiction practitioner to be abreast of up-to-date evidence-based practices for assessment and intervention, but to also be competent working with criminal justice clients and their entities. Furthermore, complexities stemming from competency to stand trial, mental state at the time of the offense, sentencing, malingering, child abuse and neglect, and child custody cases thrust the addiction counselor into uncomfortable legal arenas.

The Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology is an excellent resource for addiction counselors to turn to. Although the guidelines are meant for psychologists, the principles are beneficial to the field of mental health and addiction. This presentation will focus on the complexities of the forensic addictions field, review specific specialty guidelines relevant to the addiction counselor, describe the relevant components of competency to stand trial, mental state at the time of the offense, sentencing, malingering, child abuse and neglect, and child custody evaluations, and recommend basic practices when coordinating with the criminal justice and legal system.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to identify and describe specific ethical guidelines from the Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology as it relates to cases surrounding addiction.

  2. Participants will be able to outline components of addiction-related and mental health case law and describe its impact on the field of addiction counseling today.

  3. Participants will identify and describe specific components of competency to stand trial, mental state at the time of the offense, sentencing, malingering, child abuse and neglect, and child custody as well as how the addiction counselor's work can impact outcomes.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Integrating Neurobiology and Psychodrama in Group Therapy
Jean Campbell, LCSW, TEP
Jim Tracy, DDS, MFTi, LAADC, CP, PAT


After years of trauma, addicts and alcoholics typically come to treatment with dysregulated nervous systems that can inhibit their ability to stay engaged in the therapeutic process and move down the path of recovery. There have been profound advances in the field of interpersonal neurobiology that can assist us in our therapeutic work, including confirmation that our ability to co-regulate each other's nervous systems contributes to the increased potential for healing.

In this didactic and experiential workshop - given in two parts - we will explore how sociometry can help addicts and alcoholics to lower anxiety, calm their nervous systems, and integrate kindness, love and support, allowing them to "land" in the room and be more fully engaged in treatment. Moreover, participants will learn they psychodramatic technique of doubling to assist addicts and alcoholics to begin to tune into their emotions, while maintaining affective and somatic regulation, thus reducing the potential for relapse and giving them a greater shot at sustainable recovery.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to identify 2 benefits for utilizing sociometry with addicts/alcoholics in treatment.
  2. Participants will be able to identify 2 benefits for utilizing doubling with addicts/alcoholics in treatment.
  3. Participants will be able to name 2 tools of interpersonal neurobiology that can benefit recovering addicts/alcoholics.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

The Effectiveness of Non-Religious Forgiveness Therapy in Counseling Addicts
James Dincalci, MA
Eric Donaldson, Ph.D.

Though forgiveness research has demonstrated profound mental, physical, and emotional benefits for the person using it, forgiveness therapy is not being used sufficiently in counseling. In separate studies, non-religious Forgiveness Therapy has been effective in helping with Personality and Conduct disorders; Separation, Anxiety, and Panic Disorders; phobias and paranoia; depression and Bipolar Disorder. It significantly reduces anger, increases self-confidence and hopefulness, and heals damaged relationships. It produces improved outcomes for those who suffer from substance abuse and is effective in working with PTSD, abuse, and trauma. Forgiveness is for the addict not the perpetrator, and is a necessary action to lower stress and to keep the peace and well-being of a person and their family. Research has also shown that it helps relieve pain and distress of those harmed, injured, or victimized. Changes include enhanced self-respect; more positive mental states; improved emotional states; and the ability to pursue constructive goals. Participant skills gained: How to get past the major blocks to forgiving, i.e., a. The 12 false cultural myths; b. Neurological stress response; c. Psychological defense mechanisms. Familiarity with the key therapy elements will allow participants to make forgiving easier and learn effective forgiveness processes.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Inspire the addiction recovery community to consider the research-driven benefits of Forgiveness Therapy that enable clients to let go of anger, resentment, grudges, blame, and guilt; even from trauma and abuse.
  2. Enable addiction recovery professionals to get their clients past the major cultural myths that often stand in the way of forgiveness, and confront the neurological and psychological mechanisms that prevent forgiveness.
  3. Ensure that recovery clinicians know how to effectively use different proven, non-religious forgiveness methods, perspectives, and key treatment components that make forgiving easier for their clients.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

 
1:00PM - 2:00PM Exhibits
 

2:00PM - 3:30PM
Keynote

How Tapping Into a Higher Power Can Improve Our Relationships: A Practical Path Toward Deeper Connections
John Amodeo, PhD, MFT

Trusting a Higher Power is a central to Twelve-Step programs. How can we apply that principle to our relationships in a practical way? We will borrow from Eugene Gendlin's Focusing, which is based on research into key factors that make psychotherapy effective. We'll explore how the Focusing attitude of pausing, courageously acknowledging our authentic feelings, and holding them in a gentle, caring way is a powerful spiritual practice.

Embracing our felt experience without trying to fix ourselves requires a trust and openness in something larger than ourselves. We take the leap of faith to engage with emotions that may be uncomfortable or difficult - trusting that something more will come - some kind of grace that will move our lives forward. Focusing offers a path to help individuals and couples cultivate emotional sobriety, which creates a foundation for fulfilling and meaningful relationships.

Focusing isn't so much a technique as it is a natural way of being and a soulful way to help couples mindfully uncover - and then reveal - the ever-deeper layers of their authentic experience. As couples notice and express their feelings and sacred longings in a soulful, non-shaming way, a climate for intimacy and love is nurtured.

This workshop will explore how Focusing may be applied to your work with couples and complement the work you are already doing. Through presentation, discussion, and scripted role plays, we will demonstrate how to help couples understand themselves and each other more deeply, shift the stuck dynamics between them, nurture connection, and cultivate respect and kindness toward themselves and each other.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Have a basic knowledge of how to use Focusing with individuals and couples and understand the implicit spiritual dimension of Focusing.
  2. Discern when a Focusing intervention may be appropriate for a couple.
  3. Learn Focusing-specific questions to help an individual or couple to pause, attend to inner experience, and communicate that experience in non-blaming, non-shaming ways.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 
3:30PM - 4:00PM Exhibits
   
4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshops

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

Mindfulness Informed EMDR Treatment: A Treatment Planning Template for Recovery Services
Jamie Marich, Ph.D., LPCC-S, LICDC-CS
Stephen Dansiger, Psy.D., LMFT

Addictions treatment has come a long way over the centuries, particularly since the advent of Alcoholics Anonymous over 80 years ago. For the past 2600 years, Buddhist mindfulness and the therapies and practices it has brought about have contributed to psychological and spiritual relief to millions of people. Over the last 25 years, our understanding and the treatment of trauma related disorders and difficulties have progressed, with Francine Shapiro's development of EMDR therapy and the AIP model representing a particular highlight. The understanding of the link between traumatic experiences, regardless of whether PTSD is present, and the difficulties and suffering of alcoholics and addicts has grown. SAMSHA and other clinical bodies have indicated the need for addictions treatment to follow the principles of trauma-informed care. There is a need, and now there is a template, for integrating all of this knowledge and practice into a design of an addictions treatment center. This presentation will make clear the theory and research behind the development and implementation of both mindfulness and EMDR Therapy as central to addictions treatment, how the 8-phase EMDR protocol and AIP model can be the theoretical orientation for addictions treatment in general, and through case studies and anecdotal evidence thus far how this model is progressing, with recommendations for further research and practice.

Workshop Objectives

  1. To define mindfulness within the scope of clinical addiction treatment best practices and discuss how incorporating the techniques and attitudes of mindful living can enhance recovery services.
  2. To describe trauma-informed care and explain how adopting trauma-informed approaches improves recovery services.
  3. To summarize the general principles of EMDR Therapy and the adaptive information processing (AIP) model, and discuss how this approach and this model can improve treatment planning within recovery services.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

Into Oblivion: The Vortex of Trauma and Addiction
Carrie DeJong, RCC

The presentation includes the following components:

1) A brief overview of trauma including general trauma information, categories of trauma, and the pervasive experience of trauma among those with addiction issues.

2) An introduction to the autonomic nervous system and how it responds in states of chronic stress, anxiety, and trauma, specifically the fight, flight, or freeze responses.

3) The two basic categories of trauma symptoms:
a) High activation and hyperarousal symptoms including overwhelming emotions, flashbacks, nightmares, increased startle response, and hypervigilence.
b) Dissociation and hypoarousal symptoms including disconnection, numbness, avoidance, and denial.

4) Introduction to the Dysregulation Vortex, a model of addiction built on an understanding of how our nervous system functions. The model combines the nervous system response to trauma (fight/flight or freeze) with the two distinct categories of trauma symptoms:
a) high activation symptoms of trauma (hyperarousal) and
b) dissociation symptoms of trauma (hypoarousal). It speaks to how substance abuse and compulsive behaviours are often used to self-medicate, dissociate, and "shut off" overwhelming activation in the nervous system that results from anxiety, chronic stress, and trauma. It also speaks to the transition into addiction as the result of chronic self-medicating as well as the move into the profound negative consequences of addiction such as total loss of control, chronic disease, loss of functioning, and suicide.

5) Depending on the length of time allotted for the seminar, there could also be an opportunity to discuss the application of the Dysregulation Vortex to work with clients.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Expand awareness of the negative impacts of trauma and chronic stress and its connection to addictive and compulsive behavior.
  2. Provide practical applications of current research in the areas of trauma and neurobiology that can assist those working with client who self-medicate trauma symptoms with addictive substances and behaviours.
  3. Provide a model of addiction that can be applied to substance abuse, addiction, and compulsive behaviours as well as co-occurring disorders such as trauma and anxiety disorders.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

The Couple Recovery Development Approach: A Relational Approach to Addiction Treatment
Robert Navarra, PsyD., MFT, MAC
Tammy Shelton, MFT, Certified Gottman Therapist

Addiction treatment models historically have emphasized individually-oriented approaches; couples are encouraged to work their own program, and to "Stay on your own side of the street". Individual recovery should be a priority recovery professionals emphasize. However, we know from longitudinal research that the couple relationship plays a significant role in addiction recovery outcomes. One study in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol, identified family relationship quality as most predictive of remission at the 8-year follow up of primary treatment (Humpreys, Moos, & Cohen, 1997). We also know from the research that while addiction takes a traumatic toll on the couple relationship, so does recovery: divorce rates are 4-7 times higher for couples with addiction histories, with many of those divorces happening after the partner begins recovery. Research from the Family Recovery Project, directed by Dr. Stephanie Brown and Dr. Virginia Lewis normalized the difficulties relationships experience after recovery begins, referred to by Dr. Brown as "The trauma of recovery". Often overlooked in recovery, these continued difficulties experienced in the relationship in turn increases the likelihood in stress-induced relapse.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the three components of successful couple recovery.
  2. Learn four interventions to help couples in recovery.
  3. Define and differentiate interdependency from codependency.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

4:00PM - 6:00PM Workshop

Attitudes and Best Practices in Cultivating a Solid and Effective Clinical Team
Allen Berger, Ph.D., LPC
Rob DeClark, MSW
Pete Nielsen, LAADC

Developing a highly effective clinical team is essential to a high level of quality of care and to positive treatment outcomes. This workshop will focus on the attitudes and practices that help to develop well trained clinicians and ways to continue their ongoing clinical development. Topics addressed will include integrating the results of practice based evidence into the clinical process, using staff surveys to identify critical areas of training, best practices regarding in-service training, and the advantages of live supervision.

Workshop Objectives

  1. How to create staff surveys that identify critical areas of development.
  2. Three advantages and challenges of live supervision.
  3. Describe two attitudes that nourish and foster the development of the staff's clinical skills.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

7:00PM - 10:00PM Gala Awards Banquet

Gala Awards Banquet
Open to all registered attendees with invitation.

Lifetime Achievement Award

This award is given to an individual or treatment center in recognition of their outstanding contribution to the field of addiction treatment. Both the nature and impact of their contribution are taken into consideration when selecting the recipients for this award. Our recipients are honored for their ongoing efforts to facilitate ethical and effective approaches to treatment.
Past Recipients include:
2011 - Mrs. Betty Ford and The Betty Ford Center
2013 - Len Baltzer
2015 - The Mooney Family and Willingway Hospital
Current recipient: Jerry McDonald
Jerry McDonald

 

McMillen Family Foundation Outstanding Counselor Award

This award is given to a clinician in recognition of their outstanding clinical contribution to the field of addiction treatment. The recipient of this award has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to helping individuals and families who are suffering from addiction by providing outstanding direct clinical services and/or by their clinical leadership and effective clinical supervision.
Past recipients include:
2015 - Bev Roesch, LCSW - Cirque Lodge
Current recipient: Lee Larimer, Ph.D. - Beacon House
Leee Larimer

 

Outstanding Pioneers in the Field of Interventions Award

This award is given to an interventionist in recognition of their outstanding contribution to advancing the field of interventions. The recipient is a pioneer in the field of interventions and has made a significant impact on the field through educating others on his or her approach to interventions. This person has a reputation for conducing ethical and effective interventions setting only the highest standards for his or her colleagues.
Current recipient: Ed Storti
Ed Storti

No CE Credit

 

 

Sunday, February 5, 2017

8:00AM - 9:00AM Exhibits
 

9:00AM - 10:30AM
Keynote

THE RECOVERY DECISION: An INTRApersonal Model for Establishing Our Client's Responsibility for Recovery
Thom Rutledge, LCSW

Thom Rutledge brings his 30 years of experience treating alcoholism and addiction to this eye-opening fresh look at what is often considered to be addiction recovery's arch enemy: Denial. Denial is not an obstacle to addiction treatment; it is the object of the treatment. Specifically, denial is a clever and versatile inner- attorney whose job is to help the addicted person retain the right to continue to drink or use. The bad news is that denial does not go quietly into the night. Instead it adapts and changes as treatment progresses. Once the bright light of awareness has revealed addiction, the blatant denial of "I don't have a problem with alcohol" is rendered useless. Denial then transitions smoothly into more subtle approaches: rationalization, distraction, excuse-making, minimization, etc. From there, evaluation and treatment of addiction can all too quickly devolve into power struggle between treating professionals and their clients.

The good news is that in order to recover from addiction, we don't need denial to go away or back off or be quiet. In fact, one very essential key to establishing successful recovery is that we understand that all attempts to be rid of denial (of addiction itself) will only waste valuable time and energy. As treating professionals, when we misunderstand this, we are destined to remain in power struggles with our clients, essentially acting as if it is our job to win the power struggles, to convince clients that we are right, basically to sell our clients recovery. This is introducing recovery from the outside in and, while it can be successful with some clients, it is not nearly has powerful as guiding clients to build recovery from the inside out.

As addiction treatment professionals we have been taught to expect power struggle, even to characterize evaluation and early recovery by our doing battle with a client's resistance. That approach can produce positive results, but there is a better way. The down side of this old paradigm is that it begins with an understanding that the counselor knows the truth and the client does not, that the counselor is there to impart wisdom and the client's job is to overcome his resistance to receiving that wisdom. At times with only quite subtle changes, The Recovery Decision program challenges clients to accept responsibility from the very beginning of recovery, even during evaluation. And counselors are not there to impart wisdom, but to accompany clients in discovery of a wisdom that is specific to them as individuals. The implementation of this model establishes that while treatment professionals bring their expertise (from professional and personal experience) the choices about what to do with therapeutic discoveries are always the clientss.

Workshop Objectives

  1. How to evaluate individual client's personal relationship with addiction.
  2. How to describe and demonstrate for clients how to practice separating themselves from their addiction.
  3. How to avoid power struggles with clients. Specific methodology to enlighten clients about their own internal power struggles.

1.5 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 
10:30AM - 11:00AM Exhibits
 
11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshops

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Intoxicating Cycles of Shame: The Missing Link in Treating Co-occurring Substance Abuse and Eating Disorders
Margaret Nagib, Ph.D.

A deep sense of shame often underlies and drives eating disorders (ED) and substance abuse (SA). When these two disorders co-occur, the level of shame intensifies. The special challenges of treating these co-occurring disorders will be discussed and this presentation highlights shame as a key force underlying and perpetuating the cyclical nature of these disorders. Clinicians will learn how to identify and help individuals break the patterns of shame that drive destructive behaviors.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to articulate and identify the special challenges in diagnosing and treating co-occurring ED and SA.
  2. Participants will be able to articulate and identify the cyclical role that shame plays in the precipitation and perpetuation of these disorders.
  3. Participants will be able to identify and articulate practical ways to help individuals break cycles of shame and destructive behaviors in ED and SA.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Internal Family Systems: Strategies for Transformation (in the treatment of substance abuse, trauma and attachment related disorders)
Kathleen Murphy, MA, LPC

Childhood trauma dramatically interferes with the construction of an organized or coherent sense of self or the ability to self-regulate both psychologically and somatically. In this presentation we introduce the Internal Family Systems (IFS) model as a compassionate and powerful method to assist both therapists and clients in identifying the authentic self, as well as generating compassion for protective parts of the personality, which may now be generating painful relationship strategies.

Additionally, we focus on understanding the effects of early childhood relational wounding on current relational strategies, looking through the IFS lens in identifying symptoms and addiction as an attempt at regulating relational discomfort and pain.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Identify the different components of the Internal Family Systems Model and discuss how to integrate the model into current practices.
  2. Summarize the notion of self as defined through Internal Family Systems and apply its usefulness in relation to resolving resistance.
  3. Through individual analysis, illustrate how the IFS model increases curiosity and compassion for both client and therapist, allowing for an alternate view of suffering.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Spirituality: The Missing Link in the New Health Care Plan
Bill Starr, Chaplain, D.Min, MAC, CDP
Dan Thomson, MA
Eyglo Bjarnadottir, M.Div.

Research and experience recognize spirituality as a key ingredient in the changing landscape of effective health care. There are many new developments in the field, including new treatment concepts, new medications being introduced, the DSM-5 diagnosis criteria and the Affordable Care Act. Why then is the role of spirituality often being ignored as a part of the changes in multi-dimensional patient care?

In 2006, the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion published an important report that provided eight recommendations as a foundational piece in the development of our national healthcare plan. One of them was to: "Champion a focus on wellness that acknowledges the roles of mental health, spirituality, and complementary and alternative medicine across the lifespan."*

This workshop will respond to that recommendation, and how treatment providers can effectively integrate evidence-based spiritual practices into their programs. We will look at a variety of spiritual interventions available, the impact they can have on Substance Use Disorders, and practical ways to include them in a variety of treatment modalities. This will include: how spirituality can be used as means for managing cravings, how a variety of spiritual practices effect brain function, as well as enhancing a general state of well-being which can replace a desire to use chemicals. The presentation will incorporate research studies and brain imaging, traditional and non-traditional spiritual practices.

* Recommendations for Future Efforts in Community Health Promotion: Report of the National Expert Panel on Community Health Promotion; CDC presentation.

Workshop Objectives

  1. To highlight the growing recognition and acceptance by the medical community of spirituality as an important aspect of patient care.
  2. To identify how a variety of spiritual practices effect and change brain function, and how they contribute to improved recovery outcomes.
  3. To demonstrate and practice a variety of specific spiritual exercises such as mindfulness meditation and forms of prayer which can be effectively be used in a treatment setting, and explore new and creative ways of implementing spirituality into the emerging models for addiction treatment.

2 hours CE Credit
Intermediate course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Gift of Empathy: Burn Out, Vicarious Traumatization and Compassion Fatigue in Clinicians
Sulabha (Su) Abhyankar, LCSW

Mental health care professionals have the difficult job of dealing with pain and suffering on a daily basis. Part of a care taking job is to instill hope and empower clients to make healthy choices in their lives. This type of work can take a physical, emotional and spiritual toll. It is important to attend to and understand how to manage the effects of our work in our professional and personal lives.

Participants will understand concepts of empathy, both conscious and unconscious. They will learn strategies to manage and avoid burn-out, vicarious traumatization (VT) and Compassion Fatigue (CF). Participation in role play exercises to identify transference and counter transference issues within the therapeutic relationship will take place. Participants will practice recognizing body sensations, intuitive awareness of verbal and non-verbal cues that reveal the dynamics in the interactions. Education and role-play demonstrations on Karpman's Drama Triangle to manage personal and professional boundaries and practice good ethical behavior.

The ProQOL: Professional Quality of Life Scale (www.proqol.org) is a free tool to assess burn-out, secondary trauma and compassion satisfaction. This tool will be provided to the participants so they can evaluate their professional and personal goals. The goal of this presentation is to support, encourage and validate the clinician's role in the field of addiction treatment and to empower them to be successful.

Workshop Objectives

  1. Gain an understanding of Burnout, Vicarious Traumatization (VT) and Compassion Fatigue concepts.
  2. Recognize signs and symptoms and contributing factors.
  3. Employ effective strategies for management and prevention of compassion fatigue including resources for continued support.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

11:00AM - 1:00PM Workshop

Increasing Your Therapeutic Effectiveness with Families: Discovering the Link Between Empathic Parenting and Navigating Addiction in the Family
Jeff Jones, LPC, CACIII

This talk will illustrate and describe multi-generational structural patterns that occur in families with addiction. Techniques and tools will be explained that reduce shame, fault, and stigma, empowering family members to reframe the painful pathway addiction has taken historically into unified strategies to heal from the ramifications of the cycle of generational addiction. A comprehensive model that empowers family members to make positive structural change, learn and practice skills of resilience, and navigate family connections in the future will be presented.

Workshop Objectives

  1. To gain a unique overview of an integrative perspective of patterns and roles that reinforce trauma over generations in families with addiction, and what you can do to change it.
  2. Visually and experientially demonstrate how patterns and roles occur in families with addiction, how these patterns contribute to addiction moving through generations, and how families can start the process of change.
  3. Identify a dynamic map of empathetic parenting over centuries, how this map relates to navigating addiction in the family and is useful in reframing the past narrative and opening/inspiring future choices for each individual.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

 
1:00PM - 2:00PM Exhibits
 

2:00PM - 4:00PM
Keynote

Disordered Eating, Eating Disorders, and Food Addiction Etiology and Treatment
Rebecca Cooper, LMFT, LPCC, CEDS

Eating disorders, disordered eating and food addictions awareness is where alcoholism awareness was 30 years ago. Over fifty percent of patients with substance abuse or dependence also have a dysfunctional relationship with food. This co-morbidity is much higher due to unawareness and the lack of self reporting. Eating disorders have the highest mortality of any mental disorder. Recovery from substance dependence is precarious if the disordered eating is not addressed.

Treatment for eating disorders must be multi-faceted and each area has to be address for long-term recovery. The etiology of the disorder, neurochemical, physical, and mental changes determines the modality of treatment. Genetics, mood disorders, personality traits, traumas, food allergies, motivation, and support systems also indicate the best method of treatment.

There are neurochemical changes that occur in patients with eating disorders. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa have different chemicals that promote the respective disorders. Studies are now showing that binge eating can alter brain functioning and promote addiction-like properties in response to some foods. Mood disorders commonly co-occur with eating disorders.

Genetic predisposition is also a factor in the creation of eating disorders, but now scientists are showing gene expression can change. The genes are changed by proteins (Histones) that are effected by our lifestyle, environment, and food consumption. These changes are inheritable.

A widely used method for weight control has shown to actually create disordered eating, eating disorders and obesity. This method creates long term changes in circulating hormones that controls appetite and satiety. Treatment for eating disorders must change. Science is giving clinicians many more tools that can help cease this worldwide epidemic.

Workshop Objectives

  1. The participants will be able to identify the different types of disordered eating and the characteristics necessary for the disorders to start.
  2. The participants will be able to summarize the effects disordered eating behaviors have on genetic expression and the brain chemistry.
  3. The participants will be able to utilize methods for the prevention and treatment of eating disorders, disordered eating and food addictions based on the type of disorder.

2 hours CE Credit
Advanced course

2:00PM - 4:00PM Exhibits Load Out

 

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Scheduling Information

Travel
The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel is close to Los Angeles Airport and runs a shuttle 24 hours per day. Registrants can arrive on the first day of the conference and depart on the last day of the conference.

Pre-Register
For those that pre-register, your name badge and registration package will be ready for you at the conference. Avoid the on-site registration lines and pre-register.

Planning
Plan to attend the entire conference. We have scheduled premiere Keynotes for the start and the end of the conference: they are not to be missed.

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